Horatius. Horace 2019-02-04

Horatius Rating: 6,5/10 1666 reviews

Lays of Ancient Rome/Horatius

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So great was that achievement that Horace, at least, had no eye for any crudities the new imperial regime might possess. The horsemen and the footmen Are pouring in amain From many a stately market-place, From many a fruitful plain, From many a lonely hamlet, Which, hid by beech and pine, Like an eagle¬ís nest hangs on the crest Of purple Apennine: From lordly Volaterr√¶, Where scowls the far-famed hold Piled by the hands of giants For godlike kings of old; From sea-girt Populonia, Whose sentinels descry Sardinia¬ís snowy mountain-tops Fringing the southern sky; From the proud mart of Pis√¶, Queen of the western waves, Where ride Massilia¬ís triremes, Heavy with fair-haired slaves; From where sweet Clanis wanders Through corn and vines and flowers, From where Cortona lifts to heaven Her diadem of towers. It is not known to what extent the story is based on real events. To his male friends, however‚ÄĒthe men to whom his Odes are addressed‚ÄĒhe is affectionate and loyal, and such friends were perhaps the principal mainstay of his life. No more Campania's hinds shall fly To woods and caverns when they spy Thy thrice accursed sail. Horatius was known as a courageous and brave leader of the Roman army.

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'Horatius at the Bridge' by Thomas Babington Macaulay

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To whom the Romans pray, A Roman’s life, a Roman’s arms, Take thou in charge this day! Now Roman is to Roman More hateful than a foe, And the tribunes beard the high, And the fathers grind the low. The most frequent themes of his Odes and verse Epistles are love, friendship, philosophy, and the art of. East and west and south and north The messengers ride fast, And tower and town and cottage Have heard the trumpet’s blast. The republic with its two was founded by , and when he died, the leader of the Romans was. The Fathers of the City, They sat all night and day, For every hour some horseman came With tidings of dismay. In yon strait path a thousand May well be stopped by three. I, with two more to help me, will hold the foe in play.

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Lays of Ancient Rome/Horatius

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A mile around the city the throng stopped up the ways: A fearful sight it was to see through two long nights and days For aged folks on crutches, and women great with child, And mothers sobbing over babes that clung to them and smiled. The title refers to Christ and Christ's body. ¬ĎNow yield thee,¬í cried Lars Porsena, ¬ĎNow yield thee to our grace! By the right wheel rode Mamilius, Prince of the Latian name; And by the left false Sextus, That wrought the deed of shame. Yet he does it with a firm, though tactful, assertion of his essential independence. But for this stay, ere close of day We should have sacked the town! These two books are very different in theme and content.

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Horatius, by Thomas Babington Macaulay

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A wild and wrathful clamor From all the vanguard rose. Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay 1800-1859. Forthwith up rose the Consul, Up rose the Fathers all; In haste they girded up their gowns, And hied them to the wall. No sound of joy or sorrow was heard from either bank; But friends and foes in dumb surprise, with parted lips and straining eyes, Stood gazing where he sank; And when above the surges they saw his crest appear, All Rome sent forth a rapturous cry, and even the ranks of Tuscany Could scarce forbear to cheer. ¬í Loud cried the Fathers all. Quoth he, ¬ďThe she-wolf¬ís litter Stand savagely at bay; But will ye dare to follow, If Astur clears the way? Before the gates of Sutrium Is met the great array.

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Horatius, by Thomas Babington Macaulay

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At length shame roused them to action, and raising a shout they hurled their javelins from all sides on their solitary foe. Before the gates of Sutrium Is met the great array; A proud man was Lars Porsena Upon the trysting-day. Amongst the fugitives, whose backs alone were visible to the enemy, he was conspicuous as he fronted them armed for fight at close quarters. With Christ's death, there is the possibility of the forgiveness of sins. ¬Ē Round turned he, as not deigning Those craven ranks to see; Naught spake he to Lars Porsena, To Sextus naught spake he; But he saw on Palatinus The white porch of his home; And he spake to the noble river That rolls by the towers of Rome: ¬ďO Tiber! His attitude to love, on the whole, is flippant; without telling the reader a single thing about his own amorous life, he likes to picture himself in ridiculous situations within the framework of the appropriate literary tradition‚ÄĒand relating, it should be added, to women of Greek names and easy virtue, not Roman matrons or virgins. Poets are quarreling, and Rome is no longer an inspiration.

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Quintus Horatius Flaccus

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Now welcome to thy home! In about 46 bc Horace went to Athens, attending lectures at the Academy. X And with one voice the Thirty Have their glad answer given: ¬ĎGo forth, go forth, Lars Porsena; Go forth, beloved of Heaven; Go, and return in glory To Clusium¬ís royal dome; And hang round Nurscia¬ís altars The golden shields of Rome. L Was none who would be foremost To lead such dire attack; But those behind cried, 'Forward! The blow, yet turned, came yet too nigh; It missed his helm, but gashed his thigh: The Tuscans raised a joyful cry to see the red blood flow. But the Consul¬ís brow was sad, And the Consul¬ís speech was low, And darkly looked he at the wall, And darkly at the foe; ¬ďTheir van will be upon us Before the bridge goes down; And if they once may win the bridge, What hope to save the town? But the Consul's brow was sad, and the Consul's speech was low, And darkly looked he at the wall, and darkly at the foe. But when they turned their faces, And on the farther shore Saw brave Horatius stand alone, They would have crossed once more. For Romans in Rome¬ís quarrel Spared neither land nor gold, Nor son nor wife, nor limb nor life, In the brave days of old.

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Quintus Horatius Flaccus

horatius

He now enrolled Horace in the circle of writers with whom he was friendly. He reproached them one after another for their cowardice, tried to stop them, appealed to them in heaven's name to stand, declared that it was in vain for them to seek safety in flight whilst leaving the bridge open behind them, there would very soon be more of the enemy on the Palatine and the Capitol than there were on the Janiculum. Go, and return in glory To Clusium’s royal dome, And hang round Nurscia’s altars The golden shields of Rome! Thereafter, the epoch had little use for the Odes, which did not appeal to its piety, although his Satires and Epistles were read because of their predominantly moralistic tones. Porsena sent a message to Rome saying they should receive Tarquin as their king, and when the Romans refused, he declared war on them. The autobiographical aspect becomes less important; instead, the interlocutor becomes the depository of a truth that is often quite different from that of other speakers. Through teeth, and skull, and helmet so fierce a thrust he sped, The good sword stood a hand-breadth out behind the Tuscan's head. A proud man was Lars Porsena Upon the trysting day.

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Quintus Horatius Flaccus

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Aunus, from green Tifernum, Lord of the Hill of Vines; And Seius, whose eight hundred slaves Sicken in Ilva’s mines; And Picus, long to Clusium Vassal in peace and war, Who led to fight his Umbrian powers From that gray crag where, girt with towers, The fortress of Nequinum lowers O’er the pale waves of Nar. They were just attempting to dislodge him by a charge when the crash of the broken bridge and the shout which the Romans raised at seeing the work completed stayed the attack by filling them with sudden panic. No more, aghast and pale, From Ostia's walls the crowd shall mark the track of thy destroying bark. Verbenna down to Ostia Hath wasted all the plain; Astur hath stormed Janiculum, And the stout guards are slain. On the house-tops was no woman But spat towards him and hissed, No child but screamed out curses, And shook its little fist. What noble Lucomo comes next To taste our Roman cheer? Now welcome to thy home! This last named is dedicated to Augustus, from whom there survives a letter to Horace in which the Emperor complains of not having received such a dedication hitherto.

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Who Was the Roman Poet Horace?

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The tone reflects his anxious mood after Philippi. No more, aghast and pale, From Ostia's walls the crowd shall mark The track of thy destroying bark. It is time for him to abandon poetry for philosophy. In it, Bonar extols believers to, and describes for them, the kinds of people God desires--worshipers, temples, priests, and kings. Four hundred trumpets sounded A peal of warlike glee, As that great host, with measured tread, And spears advanced, and ensigns spread, Rolled slowly towards the bridge's head, Where stood the dauntless Three. Why dost thou stay, and turn away? In all this activity, his pastoral work and preaching were never neglected and after almost twenty years laboring in the Scottish Borders at Kelso, Bonar moved back to Edinburgh in 1866 to be minister at the Chalmers Memorial Chapel now renamed St.

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Horatius Cocles

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On the house-tops was no woman But spat towards him and hissed, No child but screamed out curses, And shook its little fist. The final third of his book provides an instructive call for believers. And still new versions, some of them admirable, continue to appear. Moody's evangelistic ministry in Scotland. His self-portrait is also a confession of an attitude that descends from to depression.


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