The soloist character analysis. SparkNotes: Paul’s Case: A Study in Temperament: Character List 2019-02-17

The soloist character analysis Rating: 8,5/10 924 reviews

SparkNotes: Paul’s Case: A Study in Temperament: Character List

the soloist character analysis

Despite a general stance of affection and patience, all too often Mr. Ayers doesn't appear to be paying attention. Club members also get access to our members-only section on RogerEbert. The recently and ubiquitiously released The Soloist tells the true story of an unlikely between a journalist, Steve Lopez, and a homeless, schizophrenic musician, Nathaniel Ayers. But Nathaniel as a character was pretty good, and made for great interactions among people, as you try to decode him. We are glad that Nathaniel Ayers has emerged from the shadows and that his story has been told. But at least he forces them by making himself the main character.

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The Soloist: A Lost Dream, an Unlikely Friendship, and the Redemptive Power of Music by Steve López

the soloist character analysis

Then he is intrigued, obsessed, dedicated. Times Columnist Steve Lopez, is not the next great American novelist, but his prose is clear, concise and honest. The second third of the book is about Lopez. We do have smart strategies to fill the huge cracks in the current health and housing systems if we make the right investments. Steve Lopez's writing is less that of a top-tier author and more that of a solid reporter today's poetry is tomorrow's birdcage liner , but the true story is well-served by Lopez's relatively unadorned and straightforward prose. Even though this book was not about paranoid schizophrenia, Lopez did a wonderful job in painting the picture of a person who goes through life, on a daily basis, battling this sickness. At that time, there was a violinist, 20 or so, nice Jewish boy, reasonably talented, who played in a regular spot in front of Carnegie on most concert nights, with his violin case open to receive coins.


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The Soloist

the soloist character analysis

I was intrigued by Nathaniel's story and what happened to him. Ayers's story is a tough one to tell, and Lopez does a good job telling it without romanticizing it or making it overly maudlin. Throughout the text, the reader comes to understand that Steve Lopez 32-33 is a man who believes in himself not only as a writer, but also as a person who is able to fix things for others. These themes still stay with me after I finished this book: 1 'Mental health expert will say the simple act of being someone's friend can change his brain chemistry, improve his functionality in the world. He stacked up all the slate tiles neatly.

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The Soloist: A Preamble

the soloist character analysis

My first smile was p. So I tried not to judge it by the standards of a novel. Lopez gains as much, if not more, from the friendship than Mr. He never becomes a social worker, he's not an expert on mental health, he doesn't have any big answers to these enormous social problems that Nathaniel symbolizes-- but I don't think this book is trying for anything that big. After all, this book is meant to raise awareness of the disease of schizophrenia and the impacts this disease has on good people like Nathaniel. We see a connection between the two men, but not communication. This is one of my favorite music-centered books I've read in my life.

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The Soloist Movie Review & Film Summary (2009)

the soloist character analysis

So the grim reality is that most of the mentally ill will probably remain on the streets, largely ignored by the swirling society around them. Lopez needed to do explain the legal document clearly before letting Nathaniel read it on his own and develop predictably paranoid fears. What we cannot excuse, however, is doing nothing or, just as negligent, relying on failed systems and methods that produce ineffective results for people who are homeless with mental illnesses. Another aspect of the The Soloist that makes it worth reading are the lessons taught throughout the story. Second time around: Still captivated : Mr. I mentioned before how Lopez decides on the hands-off approach to helping people who don't want help, and might not understand how much it will help them. The truth is that most of us think that the mentally ill are just different than we are, and we can't be bothered to try to help them.

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The Soloist Movie Review & Film Summary (2009)

the soloist character analysis

Of course you can actually be friends with a schizophrenic! Nathaniel Ayers is a Cleveland, Ohio native, who has transplanted himself to Las Angeles. It is a true story based on investigative journalism, which eventually tells more about the author than the subject. I believe anyone, whether in orchestra or the marching band, who can understand the redemptive power of music would greatly benefit from reading Nathaniel's story. How can I urge this person to get the help they need?. An idealistic, lying, suicidal young man, Paul fits in nowhere and looks down on nearly everyone he knows. It's no Disney movie, though, and I give Lopez credit for acknowledging the three-dimensional aspects of this story. The ability of the housing developers and local agencies has increased substantially.

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Steve Lopez

the soloist character analysis

A journalist tries to help a homeless schizophrenic cello prodigy find his way in the world. While this adds greatly to the accuracy and truthfulness of the book, it does very little to keep the reader entertained throughout as a large amount of the story is mere documentation of Nathaniel and his antics. He makes himself and his resources available to Nathaniel without a sense of boundaries or limits. If the schizophrenic musician resists others' attempts to offer him housing, to what extent should his wishes be respected? This is an old concept; cool to find it in real life, but an old concept. What this reveals is that for Lopez, as fascinating and interesting as a homeless but talented musician might be, the most important part of life centers on Lopez himself and his career. Unfortunately, the specified treatment was found ineffectual and brought about a traumatic experience that he eventually preferred to roam the streets instead, expressing repugnance against the traditional administration of his requisites toward mental health. This is especially true because there is a proven way to facilitate their recovery, helping them realize their dreams.

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What The Soloist Tells Us About Homelessness and Mental Illness in America

the soloist character analysis

Descriptions such as this, make each man seem like they are not just a character in a book, but someone a reader has known for a long time. Greg stayed a mystery-- one in a sea of unknown tragic lives. The mayor begins to realize that this place needs help and is more than willing to put this on top of his list. Having heard about this story ahead of time, I knew the general outlines but I enjoyed hearing the whole book quite a bit. The screenplay by is based on the book, The Soloist by.

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character analysis

the soloist character analysis

Lopez writes this biography in a journalistic na Steve Lopez does a wonderful job in capturing and sharing the story of Nathaniel Anthony Ayers; homeless man, who, in his prime, was a musical protege in Julliard. The psychological complexities crystallize and we see that within a hornet's nest of deficits and distress lie a core of idiosyncratic strengths and undeniable. Empathy could have prevented the climactic fistfight - all Mr. He has me examining what I do for a living and how I relate to the world as a journalist and as a citizen. Cracks in systems exist, but people like Nathaniel do not have to fall through them.

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Steve Lopez

the soloist character analysis

When he isn't angrily diving into oncoming traffic to pick up charred cigarette butts, he wanders homelessly among the predators and drug addicts of Skid Row, Los Angeles. What one wonders, on finishing a book like this, is how such volumes can be published without provoking a nationwide reassessment of our social safety-net. Lopez treats Nathaniel like any other friend and, therefore, unintentionally models what not to do. Steve Lopez is able to hook readers in with his captivating and heartfelt story of Nathaniel. Lopez is obsessed with Mr. Getting nowhere, Lopez finds and contacts Ayers' sister, who gives the columnist the information he needs: Ayers was once a with the cello, until he began displaying symptoms of schizophrenia at Juilliard. And Lopez is refreshingly honest about such inherent problems in telling Ayers's story: Ayers shouldn't get treatment different from Los Angeles's other homeless people, but he does because of his talents and because Lopez is writing about him; Lopez is using Ayers to fill his column quota and advance his career, but also genuinely cares about the man; Lopez wants to get Ayers off the streets and living a more normal life, but Lopez realizes that such efforts are partly to satisfy his own ego; Lopez wants to be a good friend to Ayers and have him in his life, but he's sacrificing time with his own family, who should be his first responsibility, to devote so much time to Ayers.

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