Treatment of women in hamlet. Shakespeare's Treatment of Women in His Plays Essay 2019-02-18

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Hamlet 's Treatment Of Women

treatment of women in hamlet

To sustain this viewpoint, Linda Bamber invents her own past for Hamlet. Portia was highly respected in life, and in order to be highly respected in death, she felt that she had to show her bravery in an excruciatingly painful death. Incapability of thinking or acting on her own causes her to lose her identity as a woman by allowing herself to be molded by men - depends upon her father to instruct her and submits entirely to his will Hamlet's love interest at beginning, but her obedience and conformity to men break them apart Hamlet's angry feelings towards his mother for loving another man are directed towards Ophelia, who has put her sense of love and duty towards her family rather than Hamlet. It is true that the play is ultimately concerned with the conflict between love and politics; Egypt and Rome; but to simply reject the former as wrong, is to miss the nuances of the play and succumb to a view of the polarities of masculine and feminine as separated and distinct, which the play itself undercuts. It is extremely difficult for Hamlet to accept the fact that his mother was able to replace his father so quickly. Ophelia and Gertrude, two important women that are supposedly loved by Hamlet, are treated with a great deal of disrespect by the Prince. The treatment of Africa can be paralleled to the treatment of black women throughout these five stages….

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Hamlet’s View and Treatment of Women , Sample of Essays

treatment of women in hamlet

Shakespeare and Feminist Criticism 1991 © Liz Lewis November 2001 See also: Search this site. Although I am inclined to agree with McLuskie that as Shakespeare 'wrote for a male entertainment', it is historically incorrect to regard him as a feminist. It was too much for Hamlet to accept the death of his father by the hand of his uncle and the adulterous behavior of his mother, so consequently he was very harsh on Ophelia. He is denouncing her as though she is just like all women and is personally responsible for the way women trap men with their flirtatious tricks. The most apparent display of misogyny is shown by Hamlet himself, in his treatment of Gertrude, his mother, and Ophelia, his love.

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Shakespeare's Treatment of Women in His Plays Essay

treatment of women in hamlet

Hamlet, like other heroes, rages against women when he loses his place in the sun. Hamlet, contains retaliation, murder and treason, unfulfilled endearment, and insanity. I do think, with submission, that the love of Hamlet for Ophelia is deep, is real, and is precisely the kind of love which such a man as Hamlet would feel for such a woman as Ophelia. Characters in the play that are juxtaposed against each other are Hamlet with Laertes, Hamlet again with Fortinbras and Ophelia with Gertrude. At this point Desdemona becomes more of a stereotype, her identity disappearing as Othello's jealousy becomes more defined.

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Women In Hamlet

treatment of women in hamlet

The play could not have been developed if Gertrude had not married Hamlet's uncle, which was the factor that provided Hamlet's motives for killing Claudius. Although he claims not to have given such gifts, she says My honored lord, you know right well you did, And with them words of so sweet breath composed As made the things more rich. This is most likely due to the time period in which the play is set, where women did not have many rights in society. Hamlet is a good example of a son's treatment of his mother reflecting how he will treat the woman he loves because when considering Hamlet's attitude and treatment of the in William Shakespeare's play, Hamlet, one must first consider how Hamlet treated his mother. To post with such dexterity to incestuous sheets! Throughout the play, Shakespeare portrayed Hamlets treatment of Ophelia as disrespectful and crude in many manners. The conception of woman's inferiority to man in these tragedies is undercut by Shakespeare for he shows Desdemona to be the virtuous character who is finally vindicated. The two women are thought to be superficial, but considering the devices such as tone, juxtaposition and imagery as well as analysing their character intentions and behaviour it should be extremely apparent that this is not true and that they obviously do display depth.

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Shakespeare's Treatment of Women in His Plays Essay

treatment of women in hamlet

Hamlet, like other heroes, rages against women when he loses his place in the sun. More coursework: Hamlets treatment of ophelia and gertrude Modern folklore suggests women look at a man's relationship with his mother to predict how they will treat other women in their life. It is the raging ideals that are responsible for his terrible treatment of dear, innocent Ophelia in Act 3. Hamlet does seem to possess a great hatred for women, especially…. Lives completely dependent on men Queen Gertrude Beautiful and innocent young woman also controlled and led by men - depends on her father and brother for guidance on how to behave while looking to Hamlet for love and affection. Despite the fact that the women in Hamlet, especially Gertrude, tried to show that they could be strong it was.

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Women In Hamlet

treatment of women in hamlet

Another significant aspect of Hamlet's treatment of women, is how the currently negative treatment is extended to how Shakespeare portrays their sexuality. Before vowing to avenge his father's death, he comments on the sins his mother committed. His prejudice helps clarify the issue of women's rights and how they are viewed throughout the play. She is a good daughter and lover trying to do her best to please both her father and the one she loves. In either case, the role and treatment of women in Hamlet is essential to discuss with an open mind.

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Women In Hamlet

treatment of women in hamlet

Although Hamlet was pretending to be mad, he still loved Ophelia and was devastated by her disloyalty Dover Wilson, 111-112. Do kings truly have a free pass to heaven? At times, especially in the presence of the two women in his life, Hamlet seems to have a true vein of madness running through his character, brought on by despair, hatred or jealousy. His acting mad seems to cause Hamlet to lose his grip on reality. Ophelia is used throughout the play, by both Hamlet and Polonius in their plans against one another, without her knowledge. Hamlet uses his mother as an outline for all Lee 5 women and this alters his view and treatment of them as well. The play is Hamlet's most cunning scheme.

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Hamlet's View and Treatment of Women free essay sample

treatment of women in hamlet

Through his representation of womanhood, especially in the character of Cleopatra, Shakespeare indeed does transcend the stereotypes of his own time. However, in the case of Desdemona, I think it is a mistake not to recognise her as an active force within the play. As Dreher puts it 'following conventional patterns of behaviour for wives and daughters, these women lose their autonomy and intimacy and do not achieve adulthood'. It is isomorphic not with the play as a whole but only with the second phase of the tragic fable. Ophelia's feeling of guilt is reinforced by Polonius's insistence to King Claudius: But Yet I do believe The origin and commencement of this grief Sprung from neglected love Polonius's conviction, in which one can't help believing, stems from a mercenary desire to marry his daughter off to such an eligible husband as the prince of Denmark, rather than a genuine belief in his daughter's role in causing Hamlet's madness.

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Shakespeare 's Hamlet

treatment of women in hamlet

From this marriage Hamlet only thinks poorly of his mother and becomes obsessed with the betrayal she has demonstrated. Hamlet and Ophelia loved each other but very early in the play, she is told by her father to break off all contact with him. He notices Claudius is already crowned King in his absence. Elizabethan women held very little social rights and power, with strict roles in child bearing and household duties allowing them to have very little say even within their own lives. Despite clearly being set in Denmark, Shakespeare who was writing during this time, extended this traditional roles to Ophelia and Gertrude. Hamlet is understandably upset and bewildered when Ophelia severs their relationship with no explanation.


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